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20121027
20121104
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's response to a hurricane. he was in two weeks after hurricane katrina. are you confident that fema is prepared given the sheer size of this storm, almost a thousand miles in dimer. >> it is a huge storm and the impact will on the storm is so big, it is impacti sever states from dall the way up to maine at the same time. but i am rae very comfortable. we have a great administrator running the organization. he gets it, he's from florida, a good emergency manager. doesn't run around with his hair on fire. so i'm confident they will do a good job. >> on a conference call today n fact, your successor, mr. fugate said the disaster fund at fema has a billion dollars in t more or less. is that enough for this kind of response that will be necessary? >> probably at the end of the day the expenses will be more than that. but yes, it's enough for now. what the president has de, he psident has done a prelandfa declaration of all of the states up the east coast. so that allows the administrator to move supplies in now, move people in now, rescue teams in, and to get ready, work with those emerg
and new jersey have both been declared major disaster areas, which means fema will pay 75% of local governments' costs. the other 25% are shared by state and local governments. fema also has the green light to help families in hard-hit areas pay for damage that's not covered by their insurance plans. the money comes from fema's disaster relief fund. right now, it has $3.6 billion. congress has also allotted an additional $7 billion, and officials say they're confident they can foot the bill. of course, private insurance companies will also pay out claims for damage, early estimates, put the insurance industry's tab at $10 billion. still, some policy holders who didn't separate flood insurance, could be in for a big surprise. >> those policies are available through the national flood insurance program. however, if you didn't have one, you may have a situation where you're not going to have coverage for your loss if all you had was flood damage. >> reporter: insurance companies say adjusters are ready to start assessing damage and paying claims. but the scope of the damage could slow
with fema and we have lots of the oil companies... gulf oil and hess have both said that they will deliver gasoline with the national guard and fema to any gas station that is not giving out gas because they are out of gas. we are on top of the gas situation. >> suarez: frustration was also at a boil on new york city's staten island, where local officials complained they've been largely ignored since monday's storm. >> this is america, not a third world nation. we need food, we need clothing. >> suarez: another fight was brewing over running the new york city marathon sunday morning beginning on staten island. new york city mayor michael bloomberg defended the decision. >> it doesn't use resources that can really make a difference in recovery and that sort of thing. it's a different group of people. we have to work around the clock for people to get through this thing, and i assure you we're doing that. if i thought it took any resources away from that we would, we would not do this. >> bloomberg reversed course and announced the marathon was canceled. further adding to the frustration of
is finished. fema said today is now working on restoring power and helping people who lost their homes find places to stay. then, it will be time to assess the damage and start working through insurance claims. but as sylvia hall reports, it could be difficult for consumers to get paid. >> reporter: if you have flood insurance, it comes from a government fund called the federal flood insurance program that's backed by the treasury. most people who don't need it, don't buy it, making it hard for the program to pay for itself in the wake of a major disaster. so it's probably no surprise that back in 2005, hurricanes katrina and rita drained the fund and plunged the program $18 billion into debt. it's debt congress planned to forgive, but hasn't yet. that leaves the program on poor financial footing with only about $4 billion worth of funds available for claims related to sandy. >> from what i've seen, this could be a $5 billion to $10 billion flooding event, so more than likely, the program will have to go to congress to get additional borrowing authority. >> reporter: former program administ
are on a rescue mission in new jersey and new york's hardest- hit areas. fema is pulling in generators and working with power companies to get the lights back on. the storm's damage was so severe that president obama quickly declared major disasters in new york and new jersey overnight. the decision frees up federal dollars to help families and businesses recover their losses. it also allows the u.s. to reimburse local and state governments for some of the expenses they'll face as they rebuild. the east coast may be cleaning up, but sandy isn't finished. the storm is plowing inland, dumping snow across the appalachians. with sandy still churning, it's near impossible tonohow extensive the damage will be or how long the cleanup will last. sylvia hall, nbr, washington. >> tom: earlier, susie mentioned the challenges of getting around one of the world's largest and most congested cities with no public transportation. city buses began rolling on new york streets at 5:00 p.m. eastern time today, but only partial service and on a reduced schedule. we have more on the work ahead to get new york moving ag
have said that he would actually cut back on fema which is not as unpopular as it once was. >> he said he wanted to move as much of that responsibility to the states and to private contributions as possible. so he's getting hit for that right now. what would mitt romney's fema look like? would it be as well funded as the current organization? there's about $7 billion in the bank right now. if mitt romney and republicans were in control in congress there is a question as to how they would handle disaster relief. generally speaking they've not wanted to spend as much money on that. certainly when they do spend money on disaster relief they want to offset it usually meaning c bac on oer services that the government provides in order to pay for it. democrats tend to want to tax a little more for that or add to the deficit because of the emergency. >> ifill: chris christie as the governor of new jersey who the president will be traveling with torrow looking at hurricane damage, you can only assume that that will be many levels interpretation of that particular meeting. he said he would like
power and that power could take us seven to ten days to get back. but fema officials are here working with t utitys so they stressed it could be much sooper and they want it to be much sooner than that. >> suarez: there must have been a lot of water in basements, in any place below ground level, though. >> there is, yeah. there's a lot of damage, as there is all around new jersey, from rising waters. one other issue they have in hoboken because there are a lot of high-rises many people, especially elderly people, stayed in their high-rises. so now that there's no power they're not able to get back down. so there's a concerted effort to get around to especially elderly housing complexes and deliver those people food and water and meicine as wl. they have a few pharmacists, nurse practitioners going around to people helping them get the medication they need if they're unable to get out of their homes. >> suarez: aren't there towns very close to hoboken north and south on the hudson river that aren't as heavily affected? >> there are. jersey city is one. jersey city did get water but in
. this is their life work in terms of research. you need help not only from fema but from the national institutes of health in order to get these scientists back on their feet. >> rose: the are theidd stories we don't know about. we understand most importantly the anguish of people, lost lives and relatives and friends secondly, the loss of property and everything. your life savings and your life treasures are all destroyed by flood or fire. and then there are these hidden stories of things that you don't think about that have been damaged by the flood or damaged by the fire. that had real impact on people's jobs. >> i think so. and especially people who have been through it before. so i think about the people who ha post traumatic stress from a katrina, from 9/11 and this happens and it reinforces. guess what, where were those people on 9/11 they were at the tip of manhattan and the same area that's getting hit so hard right now. there are other areas, i came into cbs this morning somebody said i'm up in rockland county, nobody's telling that story. nasa county out on the island, there are plac
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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